Most early intergovernmental pacts resolved border conflicts, but since the early 20th century, compacts have increasingly been used as a tool for government cooperation. [2] In some cases, an agreement will create a new multi-governmental authority to manage or improve some shared resources, such as a seaport or public transport infrastructure. The typical powers and duties entrusted to intergovernmental commissions in compacts may include the following: while historical intergovernmental pacts consisted only of states as parties, the federal government has recently participated in certain pacts. [73] Indeed, some Pacts require a representative of the federal government to participate in compact governance. For example, the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and the Compact Tunnel require that a member of the 13-member board of directors governing the pact be appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, as noted above. [74] Some pacts have been implemented by Congress under federal law and provide for direct federal involvement in matters involved in the pact, such as the Interstate Agreement on Detainers,[75] which applies to the transfer of prisoners convicted of independent trials. Depending on the purpose of an intergovernmental pact, it may provide rules and procedures for future actions to promote the objectives of the pact. For example, compacts designed to create interstate boundaries, such as the Missouri-Nebraska Boundary Compact,[43] cannot contain procedures for ongoing Covenant activities. This pact first provides for the adjustment of the border between the two states and related issues, such as the definition of the transgression of state sovereignty over territories that have become members of the other state as a result of border adjustment, and the right to impose real estate located in acquired territory. [44] After negotiation, intergovernmental pacts must be approved by legislators in your affiliated states.

[10] A pact is approved by a state legislator in accordance with its procedure for enacting legislation and becomes the status of the state. [11] If approved by the legislature, the governor of a state still has the power to veto a pact if the governor so decides (subject to the legislature`s ability to strike a veto by a new vote). [12] Representatives of states negotiating a pact are well advised to ensure that their respective legislators are informed of the progress of negotiations and the resolution of issues and are familiar with them; Otherwise, a legislator may refuse to approve a pact as presented and request a renegotiation of questions before its approval is granted. [13] Compacts` approaches to their management are different.