The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), signed on 30 October 1947 by 23 countries, was a legal agreement to minimize barriers to international trade by eliminating or reducing quotas, tariffs and subsidies, while maintaining important rules. The GATT is expected to stimulate economic recovery after the Second World War through the reconstruction and liberalization of world trade. Agriculture has been essentially excluded from previous agreements, as it has been granted special status in the areas of import quotas and export subsidies, with slight reserves. However, at the time of the Uruguay Round, many countries considered the agricultural exception so egregious that they refused to sign a new no-move agreement for agricultural products. These fourteen countries were known as the “Cairns Group” and consisted mainly of small and medium-sized agricultural exporters such as Australia, Brazil, Canada, Indonesia and New Zealand. The assertion that Article 24 could be used in this way has been criticized as unrealistic by Mark Carney, Liam Fox and others, as point 5c of the contract requires an agreement between the parties so that Article 5b can be useful, since there would be no agreement in the case of a non-agreement scenario. In addition, critics of the GATT 24 approach point out that services would not fall under such regulation. [28] [29] The ERC stated that, for it, the main outcome of the agriculture negotiations was that they had “greatly contributed to defining its own common policy”. However, developing countries, which played a minor role throughout the negotiations, have benefited from significant tariff reductions, particularly for non-agricultural goods of interest to them. A general service contract, sometimes called a service contract, is used to define services provided by a company and received by an individual or other company. This document should cover the price of services, their duration, the commitments they contain and other important details. The Uruguay Round Agricultural Agreement remains the most important agreement in the history of trade negotiations for the liberalisation of agricultural trade. The aim of the agreement was to improve market access for agricultural products, reduce national aid to agriculture in the form of price-distorting subsidies and quotas, eliminate agricultural export subsidies over time and harmonize health and plant health measures among Member States as much as possible.